July 29th, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Henryk Berlewi - Mechano-Faktura (ca. 1924)

Geometry!!

Reblogged from not shaking the grass
July 29th, 2014

experimentsinmotion:

The “Bomb Ponds” of the Vietnam War

Between 1964 and 1975, 2,756,941 tons of explosives were dropped by the U.S. military across Cambodia. As historian Thomas J. Campanella notes in Design Observer, “in Quang Binh and Vinh Linh provinces (just north and south of the former demilitarized zone) the landscape resembles the face of the moon, with craters 30 to 50 feet in diameter and several yards deep.” The massive pock marks, today called “bomb ponds” in Cambodian, testify to the ambiguous heritage of these war scars. On the one hand, they have become a naturalized part of the landscape: villagers have transformed the bomb craters into ponds for growing fish, a staple of the Vietnamese diet, and in the south, bomb craters are favored sites for houses with a replenishable source of protein at the doorstep. Yet the water in these “ponds” are often still toxic, a reminder of their violent origins. In fact, a culture of silence has left this history largely unspoken. In America, there is little recognition of the bombing and in Cambodia, a reluctance to educate its youth about the history surrounding the Khmer Rouge regime. In order to bring attention back to this era and its looming effects, self-taught photographer Vandy Rattana documented these sites in 2009 as physical evidence of a history kept silent. The resulting series, “Bomb Ponds,” was exhibited at Documenta13.

We did bad things in Cambodia. Probably should not forget about that.

Reblogged from Experiments in Motion
July 12th, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Mark Rothko - Red and Black (1968)

Quite hypnotic.

Reblogged from not shaking the grass
July 12th, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Wassily Kandinsky - Black Circle (1924)

Very circular.

Reblogged from not shaking the grass
July 8th, 2014

"Proofs" for Runaway Empire

Over the last several months, Kevin Michael and I have been working diligently on fulfilling one of our Kickstarter promises, to make my latest novella Runaway Empire the first of my works to be available in print. Like so many things we’ve tackled over the last few years, it’s been a challenge to get exactly what we want.

After looking on several options (including Createspace and Lulu), we decided on Ingram Spark. They claimed to retain quality while also not allowing it to take every penny from our wallets. As with so many things in self-publishing, it’s a risk. But from what they pitched, this was a risk worth taking.

We ordered two proofs before allowing the book to be publicly available. Always check over your work. ALWAYS. You will always find a mistake. I can’t tell you the number of times I have had four or five people carefully look over work, only to look at the “final” copy and spot an error. Either way, the proofs arrived today.


image

I will admit, it was exhilarating to see something in print. I have enjoyed the luxuries and privileges of e-book publishing, but there is still a certain legitimacy in seeing words on paper. It’s probably the freshest book I’ve ever touched.

However, there are problems. The book cover is crooked, and they had a bit of an issue printing various shades of grey.

So we contacted Ingram Sparks with a revised design, and we will request that they are a bit more careful with the next round of books. Getting one book in a hundred that has a crooked book cover is expected and excusable. Getting one out of two? Come on, they can do better than that.

But overall, they did an excellent job. These are small problems. To anyone interested in self-publishing, I suggest you give them a look.

I can’t help but feel excited about the idea of getting this book out to people. I hope it succeeds, so that we can send more money to Sandy Hook Promise. It’s been one of the primary goals for this book from the outset. With a little more work and fortune, we should be in business.

July 6th, 2014
Pretty spot on.

Pretty spot on.

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Reblogged from salutations
July 1st, 2014

theniftyfifties:

Claudia Cardinale listening to Ella Fitzgerald records, Rome, 1959.

(Source: people-vinyl)

Reblogged from The Nifty Fifties
June 29th, 2014

theniftyfifties:

Ford Times Magazine cover detail,  February 1956.  Artwork by Charley Harper.

I dig this.

(Source: rogerwilkerson)

Reblogged from The Nifty Fifties
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